How might an MP vote?

When your MP goes to vote, they often will vote either with their conscience, with their constituents or with the whip. Sometimes all three line up - great!

Conscience: 1. MPs are representatives and not delegates so should vote according to their beliefs  2. The whips may ask an MP to vote against a position they've always held or camapaigned on  3. If the MP believes the position that they are asked to take will cause such harm to the country.  Constituents: 1. In a referendum, a decision was made by constituents so an MP should vote according to the wishes of the people that they represent  2. To maintain popularity in consituency and to keep the job!   3. If the position they are asked to take has a negative impact on their constituency e.g.HS2 bill. Whip: 1. To show loyalty to party - after all MPs are usually elected because they belong to a particular party rather than because of who they are.  2. To vote with the party in the hope of a future promotion.  3. To avoid the collapse of a party- there needs to be unity to get bills passed.
Conscience: 1. MPs are representatives and not delegates so should vote according to their beliefs 2. The whips may ask an MP to vote against a position they've always held or camapaigned on 3. If the MP believes the position that they are asked to take will cause such harm to the country. Constituents: 1. In a referendum, a decision was made by constituents so an MP should vote according to the wishes of the people that they represent 2. To maintain popularity in consituency and to keep the job! 3. If the position they are asked to take has a negative impact on their constituency e.g.HS2 bill. Whip: 1. To show loyalty to party - after all MPs are usually elected because they belong to a particular party rather than because of who they are. 2. To vote with the party in the hope of a future promotion. 3. To avoid the collapse of a party- there needs to be unity to get bills passed.