Will a new PM force a no-deal Brexit?

June 12th, 2019

Some Conservative leadership candidates are toying with the idea of suspending Parliament in order to ensure the UK leaves the EU on 31st October with no-deal - the legal default.

As the Conservative Party leadership contest continues, one candidate and ex-Brexit Secretary, Dominic Raab, has said that he would be willing to shut down Parliament in order for the UK to leave the EU on 31st October. This same sentiment has since been repeated by another candidate, Esther McVey.   Is that legal? The Attorney General, Geoffrey Cox, has said that while the process (called proroguing, which means ending a parliamentary session) is
As the Conservative Party leadership contest continues, one candidate and ex-Brexit Secretary, Dominic Raab, has said that he would be willing to shut down Parliament in order for the UK to leave the EU on 31st October. This same sentiment has since been repeated by another candidate, Esther McVey. Is that legal? The Attorney General, Geoffrey Cox, has said that while the process (called proroguing, which means ending a parliamentary session) is "unconstitutional and improper", it is not actually illegal. Proroguing Parliament would also mean getting the Queen involved in political affairs. The Queen is supposed to be neutral. This afternoon, Labour have tabled a cross-party amendment which, if passes, would enable Parliament to seize control of parliamentary business away from the hands of government to prevent a future PM proroguing Parliament. Woo! “What we can’t have is this paralysing uncertainty, bad for the economy, bad for trust in democracy, bad for the Conservatives" - Dominic Raab, Conservative MP "That would be illegal if they did it for the express purpose of getting it through, it would be unconstitutional, it would be undemocratic, and it wouldn’t work.” - Rory Stewart, Conservative MP

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