What is happening in Hong Kong?

June 21st, 2019

Huge protests are taking place in Hong Kong against an extradition bill. What does this mean, though?

On the 16th June, over 2 million took part in protests against the extradition bill. This was the culmination of several previous protests, the latest of which saw a spike in police violence. In March, an extradition bill was put forward to the Legislative Council of Hong Kong (LegCo). If passed, it would allow authorities in Mainland China to request the handover of criminal suspects in Hong Kong. Many (foreign governments, journalists, NGOs) have voiced concern and opposition, citing China's politicised legal system as a threat to Hong Kong's independent ability to make laws. Hong Kong used to be a British colony. In 1997 it was handed back to China to become a special administrative area. Hong Kong lawmakers have the power to make their own laws. There is also freedom of speech in Hong Kong but not in China.     However, the Head of Government (called the Chief Executive), Carrie Lam, is appointed directly by Beijing. She has been criticised for her response to the   protests in which she has focused on miscommunication between the   government and its people and has suspended the extradition bill instead   of withdrawing altogether. It's likely more protests will follow as Hong  Kongers call on her to step down.
On the 16th June, over 2 million took part in protests against the extradition bill. This was the culmination of several previous protests, the latest of which saw a spike in police violence. In March, an extradition bill was put forward to the Legislative Council of Hong Kong (LegCo). If passed, it would allow authorities in Mainland China to request the handover of criminal suspects in Hong Kong. Many (foreign governments, journalists, NGOs) have voiced concern and opposition, citing China's politicised legal system as a threat to Hong Kong's independent ability to make laws. Hong Kong used to be a British colony. In 1997 it was handed back to China to become a special administrative area. Hong Kong lawmakers have the power to make their own laws. There is also freedom of speech in Hong Kong but not in China. However, the Head of Government (called the Chief Executive), Carrie Lam, is appointed directly by Beijing. She has been criticised for her response to the protests in which she has focused on miscommunication between the government and its people and has suspended the extradition bill instead of withdrawing altogether. It's likely more protests will follow as Hong Kongers call on her to step down.

Recent Articles