If we’re having a new PM, why can’t we have a general election?

June 19th, 2019

We’re getting a new PM, a person who will suddenly have a new bunch of powers. Why can’t we have a general election?

Unlike in the US, where voters choose the President of the country, in the UK we choose parties. And those parties choose their leaders.     This is partly because we live in a parliamentary system where the Prime Minister has fewer powers than the US President. When we vote in a general election, we should be voting for the person to represent you in your local area (although in practice, people vote for the party they love or even for who they think would be the best PM).     That being said, it is likely that any Prime Minister and the government that he has pulled together will face a vote of no confidence from the Labour Party and the other opposition parties once in office. If the vote of no confidence in the government is successful, then a general election will be triggered.
Unlike in the US, where voters choose the President of the country, in the UK we choose parties. And those parties choose their leaders. This is partly because we live in a parliamentary system where the Prime Minister has fewer powers than the US President. When we vote in a general election, we should be voting for the person to represent you in your local area (although in practice, people vote for the party they love or even for who they think would be the best PM). That being said, it is likely that any Prime Minister and the government that he has pulled together will face a vote of no confidence from the Labour Party and the other opposition parties once in office. If the vote of no confidence in the government is successful, then a general election will be triggered.

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